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3 ways a mortgage beats renting for aspiring DIY’ers

by David Leto
February 24, 2018

3 ways a mortgage beats renting for aspiring DIY’ers

by David Leto
February 24, 2018

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If your urge to undo and improve is strong enough, you might be able to put that energy to positive use by owning your home instead of renting. Besides the satisfaction you get from doing-it-yourself, you will probably come out financially ahead.

You Don't Need Permission

Renters must have permission from their landlords or property managers to make changes to the home, even for the smallest improvements. They may balk at letting tenants paint, change faucets, replace faucets, or even have carpets cleaned.

Unless there's a homeowner association involved, homeowners have complete control over their property. If they want brightly colored walls or flooring, the choice is theirs. They can remodel to the extent their budgets and abilities allow, something that few, if any, landlords will allow.

The two major issues that keep landlords from allowing tenant changes include skepticism about the tenant's qualifications as a do-it-yourselfer and the budget. Even without the labor included, even the simplest home remodeling projects cost money.

Homeowners Can Borrow the Money

The first step in buying a home is to meet with the lender will calculate the monthly payment based on the down payment and interest rate. Mortgage payments are almost always lower than monthly rent rates. The interest rates for primary home loans are usually the lowest available for any kind of borrowing.

Home values appreciate over time and you can turn the equity into a home equity line of credit (HELOC) to fund other home improvement projects that will add value. HELOCs also carry lower interest rates than other kinds of consumer loans, especially compared to credit card interest rates.

Home Improvements Add Value

By putting your do-it-yourself skills to good use, you add value to a property. How much depends on the project and the demand for the improvement. Few projects return 100 percent of the retail cost, but when you contribute the labor, you will realize a net gain.

People who flip houses make substantial amounts of money improving homes and reselling them when finished. When going this route, research which improvements are in demand in your area. Giving home buyers what they want will enhance the value of your work and possibly speed the sale.

Anyone who enjoys home improvement projects and has the do-it-yourself skills to make the work profitable has the advantage as a homeowner. For them, a mortgage is definitely better than a rent payment.

 

This article was written by David Leto from 50plusfinance and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

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